Megiddo

Uncovering the Site of the “Final Battle”

Megiddo, world-renown and celebrated, is the jewel in the crown of Biblical archaeology. Strategically perched above the Jezreel Valley, it guards the most important land route in the Ancient Near East--the Via Maris leading from Egypt to Mesopotamia. Megiddo dominated international traffic for over 6000 years--from c.7000 BCE through the Biblical era--and today is considered one of Israel’s most significant archaeological sites. As a World Heritage Site, Megiddo’s many monuments dating to the times reflected in the Bible offer everyone a special opportunity to view study and enjoy the ancient biblical world.

Biblical Archaeology: From the Ground Down

How does a dig team work? What do archaeologists look for at a dig? In this documentary DVD, learn how excavators work and what we can learn from archaeology. More information.

Excavations at Megiddo revealed layer upon layer of human occupation covering the entire span of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The monumental Early Bronze Age temples of Megiddo have no parallel in the entire Levant. In the Late Bronze Age, the Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III captured the city in one of the most daring military campaigns of ancient times. During the Iron Age, successive Israelite kings built massive palaces and fortifications throughout the city, as well as an extraordinary waterworks system. The site is perhaps most famous, however, for its appearance in the Book of Revelation, where it is designated as the site of the final battle between the forces of good and evil.
Volunteers will be housed in a pastoral kibbutz located near the site. Each room will house 3, 4 or 5 people. Rooms are fully air conditioned, have a private bathroom, and kitchenette. Volunteers have access to kibbutz facilities such as the swimming pool and grocery store.

Israel Finkelstein

Israel FinkelsteinDr. Israel Finkelstein is the Jacob M. Alkow Professor of the Archaeology of Israel in the Bronze Age and Iron Ages at Tel Aviv University and is the director of excavations at Megiddo. Previously, he served as Director of the Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University from 1996-2002. Dr. Finkelstein is the 2005 recipient of the Dan David Prize.

Eric Cline

Eric ClineEric H. Cline is chair of the department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at The George Washington University. He is currently a co-director of the Megiddo and Tel Kabri excavations and he has previously conducted fieldwork in Israel, Greece, Jordan and Egypt. As of July 2014, Dr. Cline is co-editor of the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research.

Dig Directors

Israel Finkelstein
Eric Cline

Geographic Location

Jezreel Valley, 60 miles northeast of Tel Aviv

Periods of Occupation

Bronze and Iron Ages

Dates of the Dig

June 15 - July 31, 2014

Minimum Stay

3 weeks or 7 weeks

Application Due

April 1, 2014, but earlier applications are encouraged

Cost

Regular applicants: 3 wks - $1,500; 4 wks - $1,925; 7 wks - $2,875
Consortium School Applicants: 3 wks - $1,350; 4 wks - $1,750; 7 wks - $2,650

Academic Credit/Cost per Credit/Institution

Yes - 3 to 6 credits - TBA soon - Tel Aviv University

Accommodations

Volunteers will be housed in a pastoral kibbutz located near the site. Each room will house 3, 4 or 5 people. Rooms are fully air conditioned, have a private bathroom, and kitchenette. Volunteers have access to kibbutz facilities such as the swimming pool and grocery store.

Contact

Margaret Cohen
667 Franklin Street
State College, PA 16803
Phone: 814-238-4442
dig.megiddo@gmail.com
http://megiddo.tau.ac.il

Open for tours

Yes